Farmer Event

Preparing for a Dry Summer When: Wednesday 7 November 2018 at 6:45pm for a 7pm start Where: Flying Horse Bar & Brewery, Raglan Parade, Warrnambool Light meal provided. Drinks at Bar prices. Summer of 2018-19 is shaping up as a challenging season, with fodder prices already high due the ongoing drought across much of Australia, and meteorologists suggesting a dry and warm season. Warrnambool Veterinary and Terang & Mortlake Veterinary Clinic have brought together a range of speakers to help you start preparing for the possibility of tight times in the months ahead. Presenters: Dr Blair Summerville, Veterinarian and Nutrition Adviser, Warrnambool Veterinary A Summer Feeding Model – practical tips to maximise your feed supply  John Droppert, Senior Industry Analyst, Dairy Australia Looking into the crystal ball – a perpective on milk price movements for the coming season John McKew, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Fodder Industry Association Hay supply and price forecast for summer 2018-19 Garry Smith, Director, Agribusiness Services, McLaren Hunt Financial Group The view from the accountant’s desk Lindsay Ferguson, Regional Manager & Executive Officer, WestVic Dairy  Dairy Australia’s Taking Stock and Dairy Base programs  Panel Discussion facilitated by Dr Stephen Jagoe & Phil Keegan RSVP: by 5pm on Monday, 5 November 2018 to: Warrnambool Veterinary Farm Desk: 5561 7666 or Terang & Mortlake Veterinary Clinic: 5592 2111 Download the Event Flyer Proudly supported by This informative farmer event is brought to you...

Case of the Month

Hypothyroid disease … … And why your dog isn’t really lazy afterall! “Sweet Pea” is a six year-old Pyrenean Mountain dog that came to see Dr Anthony because she wasn’t herself. She seemed painful to get up and down and was not as interactive with the other dogs she lives with. Her owner had also noticed her coat had changed and she had “dandruff”. She had also gained weight. It can be easy to assume that any middle-aged to older dog that is struggling to get out of bed has arthritis. In fact, through a thorough work up of Sweet Pea’s symptoms we were able to determine that inability to get up and down easily was not actually due to arthritis but a metabolic disorder called Hypothyroidism. Her work up included blood tests and x-rays (in which we could not see evidence of any joint disease such as arthritis). The blood test showed a low thyroid hormone level and elevated cholesterol. This prompted the vet to test for Thyroid Stimulating Hormone which was found to be high. This means her brain is telling her body to produce thyroid hormone but her thyroid gland isn’t doing as it’s told! The good news for Sweet Pea is that her Hypothyroid disease is easily controlled by supplementing her with thyroid hormone tablets. Even though it has only been a couple of months, she is back to her usual self but will require treatment for the rest of her life. Hypothyroid disease is a metabolic disease of dogs whereby their thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough thyroid hormone. In over 90% of dogs this...

Pet Dental Month – August

Bad breath is a sign of dental disease, so if your cat or dog’s breath makes you gag this may be a cause for concern. August is Pet Dental Month we are encouraging local pet owners to take an active role in keeping their pets teeth and gums healthy.  According to the latest studies, dental disease is one of the most frequently diagnosed health problems for our pets.  By the age of two, 80% of dogs and 70% of cats have some form of dental disease.   % 80% of dogs by age 3 have dental disease % 70% of cats by age 3 have dental disease Dental disease and mouth pain can affect a pet’s quality of life, appetite, behavior and general well being. Dental signs to watch out for: Bad breath Chewing on one side of the mouth or pawing at the mouth Red, inflamed or bleeding gums Tooth loss Going to the food bowl but not eating Excess salivation Build up of yellow-brown tarter around the gum line. The bacteria associated with dental disease can spread through the blood stream and cause damage to internal tissues and organs. Dental disease has been linked to numerous health problems in dogs, including liver, kidney and heart disease. Pets can’t brush their own teeth, but pet owners can help to protect their pets from dental disease by combining a good dental homecare program, with regular dental examinations and a complete and balanced clinically proven dental food. Warrnambool Veterinary offers FREE dental checks for our clients.  If we recommend a dental procedure for your pet during dental month, you will...
Neil Chesterton Lameness Seminar

Neil Chesterton Lameness Seminar

 Wednesday 29 August 2018 Dr Neil Chesterton presents Understanding Lameness: A risky business Common lameness conditions and their risk factors Dr Neil Chesterton, New Zealand, is an international expert on lameness prevention. Neil’s interesting and informative two-part talk will cover common lameness conditions and their risk factors. If preventing lameness is a high priority on your farm this seminar is not to be missed. Date: Wednesday 29 August 2018 Time: 6:45pm for 7pm start Location: Flying Horse Bar & Brewery, Raglan Parade, Warrnambool. RSPV: By 5 pm Tuesday 28 August 2018 Warrnambool Farm Desk 5561 7666 or Terang & Mortlake Veterinary Clinic 5592 2111 Light supper provided Download Seminar...

Care of Downer Cows

Dr Phil Poulton from the Tarwin Vet Clinic in Leongatha, Gippsland spoke at a Farmchat day a couple of years ago. Phil has completed a PhD looking at nursing outcomes for Downer Cows. Phil had some key take-home messages to improve outcomes in the nursing of Downer Cows: Act early in the treatment of these animals  Don’t leave them out in the elements – move them correctly into a protected area with soft bedding Give non-steroidal anti-inflammatory early, such as Tolfejec, Key or Meloxicam Ensure they have access to food and water Roll from side to side to relieve pressure on muscle tissue He has found many animals suffer from secondary conditions like mastitis, hypothermia, dehydration & muscle damage which will generally be the cause of death rather than the primary condition. Lifting needs to be done with care - if using a set of hip clamps then a chest strap should also be used and move only short distances. Otherwise, the bucket of a front end loader is ideal.  Warrnambool Veterinary have developed an easy-to-use flow chart for the potential causes of Down Cows along with a Guide on the Care and Management  of Downer Cows. To order a copy of these valuable resources please contact the Farm Desk on 5561 7666 or email to...