Pet Dental Month – August 2017!

  Pet Dental Month – August 2017 Healthy Set, Happy Pet! Warrnambool Veterinary is running a pet dental month promotion throughout August to raise awareness of pet dental problems, their prevention and treatment. An initiative of the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA), the title of this years campaign is: Healthy Set, Happy Pet!   Providing your pet with good oral care is essential for them to enjoy a healthy and happy life.  The aim of Pet Dental Month is to educate pet owners about the benefits of annual dental health checks and regular tooth brushing for older pets. Warrnambool Veterinary supports this promotion with our Free Dental Health Checks. Four out of five dogs and cats over the age of three years have some sort of dental disease which may go unnoticed by their owners. Pets often won’t show pain. Even pets with sore gums, infected mouths and broken teeth will continue to eat so owners may not see any problems. So how can you tell if your dog or cat has a toothache? Your pet’s breath should not smell bad. Bad breath is a sign of infection. Gums may be red and inflamed and the teeth stained with tartar or they may start dropping food. Annual dental health checks are an ideal opportunity for owners to find out if their pet has existing problems which have gone unnoticed. Dental health checks also help ensure bacteria and poisons from dental infections do not spread to the heart, liver and kidneys through the blood stream. We also recommend regular tooth brushing and many cats and dogs can be trained to enjoy having their...

Getting the Most From Your Vaccines

  Getting The Most From Your Vaccines By Dr Stephen Jagoe This article concentrates on how to get the best response and best herd immunity from your investment in vaccines. There are a number of factors influencing how an animal responds to a vaccine. Vaccines aim to sensitise the cow’s immune system to specific infections so that it produces antibodies and recruits infection fighting white cells to remove the infection, without the animal showing disease signs. The following is a checklist of important factors which influence the success of a vaccine program in a cattle herd. Stress Any stressful event around the time of vaccination will reduce response to vaccines: Weaning and dehorning: vaccinate before undertaking these procedures or wait 10 days before vaccinating animals after these procedures; Transportation: don’t move cattle for 10 days after vaccination, or allow at least 24 hours before vaccination after transporting cattle; Calving: Don’t vaccinate cows for at least 14 days after calving. Temperature Animals are at risk of an adverse reaction to vaccination if it the daytime temperature exceeds 29°. Do not vaccinate animals if the night time temperature doesn’t go below 23°. Vaccination Timing Vaccines need to be given from an early age to fully protect animals from disease. Always follow labels to determine when the first vaccination should be given, and the correct interval to booster vaccinations. As vaccination is an insurance policy against disease, it should be timed to coincide with periods of greater risk. For example 7 in 1 should be given to young calves (according to label directions) then timed to be given prior to first joining...

Veterinary Calf Disbudding Update

Lunch time and afternoon appointments now available Due to an overwhelming increase in demand for our Veterinary Disbudding we have added extra staff allowing us to provide you with more options. With the additional resources we can be far more flexible with appointment times and are able to cater for lunch time or afternoon bookings as well as in the morning. This means that calves that are on once daily feeds can now be fed in the morning and then disbudded later in the same day. We still require the calves to have NOT been fed within 6 hours of the procedure. The calves should be older than 2 weeks of age. Sick calves should have disbudding delayed. Veterinary disbudding with sedation and local anaesthetic, results in an average of 1.4kg greater growth over the 2 week period following disbudding (this is a 17% increase in growth rate over the period). What’s included: Heavy sedation/pain relief Local anaesthetic disbudding Antibiotic protection Hernia checks Removal of extra teats The particulars: Cost: $7.50/Hd. Calves need to be between 2-12 weeks old. We need to have at least 20 calves in a group. Like to know about Veterinary Calf Disbudding from a client’s perspective? Click here! If you wish to discuss calf disbudding then please contact Dr Glenn Cuzens at WarrnamboolVeterinary’s Farm Desk on 5561...

Exciting New Mastitis Research

  Exciting New Mastitis Research By Dr David Beggs In the next few weeks, an important research project will commence at Warrnambool Veterinary. We have been contracted by Bayer Animal Health to trial a new treatment for mastitis. The trial is being run to assist registration of the new product in Australia. Because of this a large number of samples are required. The target number is 600 cases of mastitis in each treatment group. With each herd involved, and with each case of mastitis there will be a bit of paperwork involved so that everything undertaken as part of the trial can be documented. Milk samples will need to be collected for culture by Warrnambool Veterinary staff before treatment, and the treatment course will be also be commenced by one of our staff members. The upside for farmers who choose to be involved are: All treatment costs provided at no cost to the farmer; Mastitis sampling and culture provided at no cost to the farmer, and undertaken by Warrnambool Veterinary Staff; Mastitis sampling will occur before first treatment, and again around three weeks later to assess success of treatment; There will be a payment to the farmer for each case enrolled into the trial; and Dairy farmers will receive up to date knowledge on the mastitis organisms causing mastitis in their herds. We are very excited at being involved in this project, and any farmers who are as excited as us and would like to be involved are invited to contact us for further information. Several farmers have already expressed their interest, but because a large number of samples...

Dirty Cows – Managing Endometritis

By visiting veterinary student, Grace Woodward Maximising Reproductive Efficiency Maximizing your profits on a dairy farm depends on reproductive efficiency. A big part of this is getting cows back in calf quickly. Uterine infections are common after calving and delay the time to the next pregnancy. While pus is present, the cow won’t get in calf. Checking all cows for pus 7-28 days post calving and treating infections is the key to improving reproductive performance. Overview of Endometritis Endometritis is a mild, chronic infection of the uterus. It is very common, affecting up to 40% of post-calving cows. The uterus contains pus and there may be discharge from the vagina. The cows do not seem sick and will still eat, milk and cycle normally. However until the infection clears, they will be unlikely to get pregnant. Some dirty cows are noticed by farmers if they have vaginal discharge or are obviously smelly. However, many do not show any outward signs. Time and money can be wasted in trying to join cows with underlying infections. There are other types of uterine infections. Pyometra is another type that occurs when the cervix closes and pus is trapped in the uterus, stopping the cow from cycling. Metritis is a severe infection that can cause sick cows, milk drop, fever and even death. These will be treated differently by the vet. Risk Factors for Endometritis Reduced general health Heifers > Skinny cows > Poor nutrition > Milk fever > Downer cows > General stress such adverse weather, transport, overcrowding, other diseases Reduced uterine health > Twins > Difficult birth > Uterine tears > Dead calf > Assisted calving > Uterine prolapse > Retained fetal membranes...