Important Message for Rabbit Owners

New Strain of Calicivirus Warrnambool Veterinary would like to alert all our rabbit owners of a new strain of Calicivirus (RHDV1 K5) that will be released in the first week of March this year. Calicirus, or Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease Virus, is spread by mosquitoes, insects and by contaminated objects and clothing and generally presents as sudden death in our rabbits. The release of the new virus is planned to help control wild rabbits that have become immune to the old strain of Calicivirus that was released in 1996. The existing Cylap Calicivirus vaccine is believed to be effective against this new strain of Calcivirus however the guidelines for vaccinating pet rabbits have been revised. The new recommendation is for rabbits to be vaccinated every 6 months rather than every 12 months. These recommendations will be adjusted as new research comes forward and evaluated for each particular rabbit. It is recommended that all pet rabbits be vaccinated within the last 6 months prior to the release of the RHDV1 K5 strain. In addition, it is strongly recommended that rabbits are kept in an insect proof enclosure or kept inside as a further measure to reduce the risk of contracting Calcivirus or Myxamatosis (which does not currently have a vaccination in Australia). If your rabbit has not been vaccinated since 1 September 2016 it needs a booster now. If you have any questions or you would like to schedule an appointment for your rabbit to be vaccinated call Warrnambool Veterinary on 5561 2255. Dr Anthony Down Senior...

Discount on Pet Smiles Dental Program!

10% Discount on Pet Smiles Dental Program redeemable until 28 February 2017. Warrnambool Veterinary’s Pet Smiles Program is aimed at preventing a common, debilitating and painful condition in our pets. 70 to 80% of our pets over the age of 3 have evidence of tooth and gum disease. By receiving a preventative tooth cleaning (called a “prophy”) each year, your pet is far less likely to develop problems at all. We know from human research that people with rotten teeth die younger. The same applies to pets. So it is not an exaggeration to say that you are potentially adding years to your pet’s life by regularly cleaning its teeth. What’s included in our Pet Smiles Program Full veterinary pre-operative health assessment. Admission and discharge appointments. General anaesthetic including intravenous fluids. Professional scaling to remove tartar. Charting of the mouth to look for tooth decay, pain and mouth cancers. Polishing of the teeth so the teeth are gleaming. Advice on home-care to keep that smile sparkling. Is my pet elgible? All pets are potentially eligible, but there are some conditions: Your pet must have no worse than grade 2 dental disease this means tartar or early gingivitis. If your pet has more significantproblems then our regular charges will apply. Your pet must be otherwise fit and healthy. If your pet has other problems that might affect the anaesthetic the vet will decide if this program is suitable. To take advantage of our 10% discount call our friendly reception team and book your furry friend in for a dental...

Meet Dr Erica Schmidt

We asked new Warrnambool Veterianry mixed-practice Veterinarian a few get to know you questions. Nickname: Schmidty Where were you born?: Merced, California, USA Where did you grow up?: Atwater, California, USA- “small” farming community in central California Education: Bachelor’s in Animal Science at California State University Fresno and Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from Iowa State University Family: Husband Ben Pets: Oliver, Corgi mix we brought from the States and Murphy, kitty we adopted from the RSPCA Sports & Interests: Casual tennis player, hiking and camping, recently discovered ocean swimming/body boarding! (Trying to convince Dr Mark Lewis to teach me to surf)! Favourite Pastime: DIY projects for the house and garden, trying to keep plants alive (what’s the opposite of a green thumb? That’s what I have) Footy Team: Undecided, really enjoy watching (and trying to figure out) Australian sports. Otherwise love cheering for the Iowa State Cyclones! Favourite Food: Anything dipped in chocolate Favourite Drink: love coffee, homemade lemonade, and red wine Favourite holiday spot: warm beach where I can lounge with a good book! What do you like/love about being a vet: I love pretty much everything about being a vet! I love the challenge of figuring out what’s happening with my patients, getting to interact with amazing clients, and seeing the power of the human-animal bond. My fellow vets and staff make the workplace such a great place to learn and grow as a vet, I just love it! (Super cheesy, but it’s the truth!)...

Ross River Fever and Horses

by Dr Kelly Gowland Ross River Fever is a viral disease that can affect horses as well as humans. This disease is considered endemic in Australia because it is thought be maintained in the marsupial and flying fox population. It is a viral disease that is transmitted by mosquitos, and in the right seasonal conditions can be transmitted to humans and horses. It is rare for the virus to be transmitted from horse to horse so this disease is not considered to be contagious. It has been traditionally quite rare in southern parts of Victoria with cases historically being observed in northern parts of Victoria, as well as NSW and QLD. However, one case in 2017 has been recorded in a horse in Warrnambool. Diagnosis is based on a series of blood test which is sent to a laboratory for testing. Symptoms of this disease can be quite varied, but can include; neurological signs, incoordination, stiffness, swollen joints, coughing, as well as a fever. Because this is a viral disease, there is no specific treatment. Treatment is focused on supportive care and anti-inflammatories if indicated. Most horses will recover from the disease within 2-5 days, however some horses may develop secondary complications following infection, so accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment is important. Even though this is not a common disease seen in this part of Australia, in areas with high mosquito numbers, this may be one to watch out...

Lung Diseases in Cats

by Dr Mark Lewis Breathing problems in cats can be much more severe than the animals behavior would suggest. Cats may not show significant clinical changes until their breathing is severely compromised and at this stage they can rapidly develop respiratory failure and die. The clinical signs of respiratory problems include; rapid forced breathing, panting and in more severe cases open mouth breathing. Earlier signs can include; a cough, wheezing, or decreased ability to exercise. Any cat with breathing problems should be examined by a vet and may need to have chest Xrays. The problem is often more severe than it appears to be and any type of stress can lead to sudden death. If possible we are likely to put these cats in an oxygen tent for some time before proceeding to radiology. The causes of respiratory disease include; Feline asthma, heart problems, lungworm, cancers, chest injuries and infections. Feline Asthma Feline asthma is the name given to a feline disease which has similar clinical signs to human asthma. It occurs when the small airways in the lungs (bronchi) constrict, a process known as bronchospasm. The reduction in airway size occurs at the same time as an increased mucous production in the airways, and the two combine having a severe effect on the cats breathing. The signs may occur slowly or suddenly and may be made worse by exposure to irritants such as smoke, dust or pollens. If the Xrays suggest asthma we may then need to determine if it is infectious, allergic, or parasitic. This is often done by collecting samples of fluid from the lungs and...

Home Visits – All part of our regular service

Home visits? – Yes, home visits are a regular part of our service! Warrnambool Veterinary is a full service Vet Clinic and Yes we do do Home Visits! Did you know? Warrnambool Veterinary have always offered a home visit service available to any client who prefers it. We do not charge travel for home visits in Warrnambool We can do home visits on any day but, for staffing reasons, our preference is to book them in on a Friday. Home visits done on Fridays will not incur any extra costs. Home visits are often done for vaccination, or euthanasia and can be done for sick pets but, if possible, sick animals are better seen at the clinic. Our vet can bring your animal back to the clinic if they believe further tests are required. When we do a home visit we will put the details onto your pets health record at the clinic. You can read more about our Home Visit service on our website. If you would like to know more our Practice Manager, Jen Davis, would be happy to have a chat with you. You can contact Jen on 5561...