Calf Nutrition & Weaning Workshop 16 May 2018

Flying Start Calf Workshops Wednesday 16 May 2018 Workshop Three:  Calf Nutrition & Weaning Presenters: Dr Gemma Chuck Apiam Animal Health, Veterinary Operations – Dairy Dr Ashleigh Hargreaves Warrnambool Veterinary Date: Wednesday 16 May 2018 Time: 6.45 pm for 7 pm start Light supper provided Location: City Memorial Bowls Club, Cramer Street, Warrnambool Cost: $50 per workshop or $200* for all 4 Workshops RSVP Terang: Phone 5592 2111 or email info@tmvc.net.au Warrnambool: Phone 5561 7666 or email...

Calf Disbudding Demonstration Thursday 10 May 2018

Calf Disbudding Demonstration Thursday 10 May 2018 10.30 am – 12 noon Join us for a demonstration of how stress free and painless the procedure is, for both the calf and farmer.  Improve your calves growth and wellbeing this season. Recent studies have found that calves receiving heavy sedation/pain relief and local anaesthetic prior to Veterinary Disbudding will have improved growth rates and appetites in the two weeks following disbudding. That translates to a 17% increase in growth rate in the 2 weeks following disbudding! RSVP: 5 pm Tuesday 8 May for catering purposes. Bacon & egg rolls provided! Warrnambool Veterinary: 5561 7666 Terang & Mortlake Vet Clinic: 5592...

When Quality Matters

What does colostrum quality mean? “New-born calves should be actively fed good quality colostrum as soon as possible after birth to reduce the risk of failure of passive transfer (FPT).” In this context, colostrum quality is referring to the concentration of antibodies (also referred to as “IgG”) per litre of colostrum. The higher the concentration of antibodies in a litre, the better the quality of colostrum. Good quality colostrum is defined as containing at least 50 grams of IgG per litre of colostrum. Poor quality colostrum is defined as being less than 50 grams IgG per litre of colostrum. What affects the quality of colostrum produced? The quality of colostrum produced is one of the hardest factors to influence in a colostrum management program. Colostrum quality can be affected by many different factors including breed, parity, dry period length, volume of colostrum produced and time to first milking. Jersey breed cows tend to have the highest concentration of IgG per litre of colostrum, whilst Holstein-Friesians tend to have the lowest concentrations of IgG per litre. This is associated with the high volumes of colostrum that these breeds often produce, resulting in dilution of IgG present in the udder. Previously, parity has been shown to affect the IgG concentration in colostrum, with older cows having higher quality colostrum compared to younger cows. However, further research suggests there is no difference in IgG concentration with age. Some heifers produce excellent quality colostrum and the practice of discarding colostrum produced by heifers is now discouraged. The production of colostrum in the udder commences approximately 4–6 weeks prior to calving. Therefore, the length...

How clean is your colostrum?

Good quality colostrum helps protect calves against disease in the first 4–6 weeks of life by the provision of antibodies. Research has shown that the provision of an adequate volume of clean, good quality colostrum as soon as possible after birth has long-term benefits. These include reduced veterinary costs and increased milk production in the first and second lactations. However, colostrum can become heavily contaminated during the collection, handling and storage processes. Contaminated colostrum can not only be the source of some major infectious diseases, such as Salmonella, Bovine Johne’s Disease and Mycoplasma, but the presence of these pathogens in colostrum can also inhibit the absorption of antibodies by the small intestine of the calf. Therefore, calves fed contaminated colostrum are at a higher risk of disease and failure of passive transfer of immunity. Possible sources of contamination include the teat skin, milking cup liners, hoses or the bucket itself. Sub-optimal cleaning of collection buckets and feeding equipment such as teat or tube feeders will exacerbate this problem. If allowed to accumulate, colostrum residues can be difficult to remove allowing bacterial overgrowth in hard-to-reach areas. It is ideal to thoroughly wash all feeding equipment after each use, including the sanitisation of tube feeders between calves. A simple protocol for the cleaning of feeding equipment is outlined below. For ALL feeding pails and tube feeders at the end of every feeding 1. RINSE Rinse all equipment with lukewarm water, to remove milk residue, manure and dirt. Do not use hot water at this stage as it causes the milk proteins to coagulate and stick to the surfaces. 2. WASH Use...

Exciting New Mastitis Research

  Exciting New Mastitis Research By Dr David Beggs In the next few weeks, an important research project will commence at Warrnambool Veterinary. We have been contracted by Bayer Animal Health to trial a new treatment for mastitis. The trial is being run to assist registration of the new product in Australia. Because of this a large number of samples are required. The target number is 600 cases of mastitis in each treatment group. With each herd involved, and with each case of mastitis there will be a bit of paperwork involved so that everything undertaken as part of the trial can be documented. Milk samples will need to be collected for culture by Warrnambool Veterinary staff before treatment, and the treatment course will be also be commenced by one of our staff members. The upside for farmers who choose to be involved are: All treatment costs provided at no cost to the farmer; Mastitis sampling and culture provided at no cost to the farmer, and undertaken by Warrnambool Veterinary Staff; Mastitis sampling will occur before first treatment, and again around three weeks later to assess success of treatment; There will be a payment to the farmer for each case enrolled into the trial; and Dairy farmers will receive up to date knowledge on the mastitis organisms causing mastitis in their herds. We are very excited at being involved in this project, and any farmers who are as excited as us and would like to be involved are invited to contact us for further information. Several farmers have already expressed their interest, but because a large number of samples...

Farewell from JK

  Farewell From JK By Dr Jon Kelly To all my friends, colleagues and clients. Hopefully I have seen most of you over the last little while, but for those who I have missed, Jen and I have decided to take the family on a caravan adventure around Australia. We leave at the beginning of August for at least the next 18months (unless the family fight and then we will be back sooner!). Thank you all for your wonderful friendship over the last 12 years. It has been an honour to work with you all. All the best,...