Arthritis and Joint Pain Management for Your Horse

  Arthritis and Joint Pain Management for Your Horse Introducing 4CYTE™ and EPTALIS® Osteoarthritis (arthritis) is a very complex disease that affects a large proportion of the horse population. Because of this, joint support for horses is extremely important regardless of age, and type of activity you and your horse partake in. Young horses can be affected as well as older horses. Clinical Signs and Symptoms There are two main clinical signs associated with arthritis: pain, exhibited as lameness, and effusion (swelling) of the joint. The two signs do not always occur together initially, but as the condition progresses both become apparent. Lameness may be subtle initially, and may present as the horse being reluctant to perform certain activities/movements, such as refusing jumps, through to overt lameness present at the trot or even at walk. Effusion of the joint results from the accumulation of synovial fluid within the joint, due to increased production and decreased removal. Based upon the severity of the clinical signs, combined with severity of changes on x-rays (radiographs), the most appropriate treatment regime can be developed. Treatment will not reverse the changes present, but is aimed at reducing the rate of progression of the disease, rendering the joint pain-free, and prolonging the athletic career of the horse. The response to treatment can be a very individual horse-thing, so it can take some time to find what treatments and management work best for each individual horse. 4CYTE™ Equine is a one-of-a-kind scientifically proven joint supplementation for the equine industry targeting all key areas of joint function. Epitalis is a patented plant extract with unique properties that...

Ross River Fever and Horses

by Dr Kelly Gowland Ross River Fever is a viral disease that can affect horses as well as humans. This disease is considered endemic in Australia because it is thought be maintained in the marsupial and flying fox population. It is a viral disease that is transmitted by mosquitos, and in the right seasonal conditions can be transmitted to humans and horses. It is rare for the virus to be transmitted from horse to horse so this disease is not considered to be contagious. It has been traditionally quite rare in southern parts of Victoria with cases historically being observed in northern parts of Victoria, as well as NSW and QLD. However, one case in 2017 has been recorded in a horse in Warrnambool. Diagnosis is based on a series of blood test which is sent to a laboratory for testing. Symptoms of this disease can be quite varied, but can include; neurological signs, incoordination, stiffness, swollen joints, coughing, as well as a fever. Because this is a viral disease, there is no specific treatment. Treatment is focused on supportive care and anti-inflammatories if indicated. Most horses will recover from the disease within 2-5 days, however some horses may develop secondary complications following infection, so accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment is important. Even though this is not a common disease seen in this part of Australia, in areas with high mosquito numbers, this may be one to watch out...

Warrnambool Veterinary & Apiam Animal Health

18 November 2015 Dear Warrnambool Veterinary Client, Since 1978 Warrnambool Veterinary has focused on providing the highest quality veterinary services for dairy, farm, equine and domestic pets on-farm and via our clinics based at Warrnambool, Koroit, Port Fairy and Nullawarre and is recognised as a leader in innovation, actively engaging the various levels of industry to continually improve and advance the level of service provided. Our clients’ needs and expectations are the motivating force behind our quest for continual improvement. To this end, the Directors of Warrnambool Veterinary have been in discussion with a number of very successful and well-regarded clinics across Australia about the potential to enter in to a mutually beneficial commercial agreement. The discussions have resulted in the formation of an entity, a publicly listed company, known to investors as Apiam Animal Health Ltd. The company will continue to be majority owned by the existing veterinary clinics’ directors. The aim of this company is to provide increased resources and infrastructure to support the individual practices that make up the group allowing them to do what they do now, but even better, and to grow and develop their services still further to meet the evolving needs of their clients. Under such a structure, the day-to-day management, culture, and operations of Warrnambool Veterinary will not change. Our service delivery will not change unless, of course, that change is for the better. The Warrnambool Veterinary name, logo, building and brand will not change. The only change will be our increased capacity to grow and refine our services to meet our clients changing needs, particularly across the dairy industry. The...

The New Look Warrnambool Veterinary

Welcome to Warrnambool Veterinary …   We have a new logo, our four clinics are currently being updated with new signs, our car fleet will swap the old decals for new decals and we have a new website that will go live this weekend. But what does this mean for you, our valued clients? Apart from our fresh new look nothing else has changed. The Warrnambool Veterinary brand remains unchanged. Brand is not a logo or colours it is far more than that. Brand is represented by what we do and how we do it, by our mission statement, our goals, the way we service you, our clients, and your animals, brand is the essence of Warrnambool Veterinary clinic and it will not change as we move to the new look Warrnambool Veterinary. Warrnambool Veterinary will continue to provide a quality service for you and your animals and continue to refine and improve our services to better cater for your needs into the future. We will continue to research and we will embrace new technology and services where our clients stand to benefit both clinically and financially. All that has changed is our logo and its not really a change but an evolution … a fresh new look that reflects who we are and what we do. Warrnambool Veterinary … We aim to deliver superior veterinary services to our clients and their...

The role of the Race Day Vet

By Dr Michael Wraight Warrnambool Veterinary Equine Vet Local vets work with vets from Racing Victoria to officiate at all race meetings. We work alongside the racing stewards who are in charge of the days racing. Two vets from Warrnambool Veterinary, namely myself and Dr Charlie Blackwood, will be working for the three days of the May Racing Carnival. The role of the race day vet falls into four categories: 1. Welfare of the racehorses: We are responsible for the veterinary care and attention of all the horses racing. This includes determining whether a horse is fit to run, and looking after a horse that may be sick or injured before or after a race. 2. Attending each race start at the barriers: This may involve examining a horse if the jockey or the stewards have some concern about it. Our job is to decide whether it is fit to race. In this situation with the race being held up pending our decision, a quick but decisive decision needs to be made. 3. Fairness of racing: In this role the vet is mainly working under the direction of the stewards. The stewards may determine that a horse had an uncharacteristically poor performance such as an unplaced favourite. We will examine the horse and try to determine if there is any condition or illness that may have had a detrimental effect on its performance, for example, lameness or even a heart condition such as atrial fibrillation. The findings of these examinations are reported back to the stewards as well as the trainers. The stewards will then include these vet reports...