Pet Dental Month – August

Bad breath is a sign of dental disease, so if your cat or dog’s breath makes you gag this may be a cause for concern. August is Pet Dental Month we are encouraging local pet owners to take an active role in keeping their pets teeth and gums healthy.  According to the latest studies, dental disease is one of the most frequently diagnosed health problems for our pets.  By the age of two, 80% of dogs and 70% of cats have some form of dental disease.   % 80% of dogs by age 3 have dental disease % 70% of cats by age 3 have dental disease Dental disease and mouth pain can affect a pet’s quality of life, appetite, behavior and general well being. Dental signs to watch out for: Bad breath Chewing on one side of the mouth or pawing at the mouth Red, inflamed or bleeding gums Tooth loss Going to the food bowl but not eating Excess salivation Build up of yellow-brown tarter around the gum line. The bacteria associated with dental disease can spread through the blood stream and cause damage to internal tissues and organs. Dental disease has been linked to numerous health problems in dogs, including liver, kidney and heart disease. Pets can’t brush their own teeth, but pet owners can help to protect their pets from dental disease by combining a good dental homecare program, with regular dental examinations and a complete and balanced clinically proven dental food. Warrnambool Veterinary offers FREE dental checks for our clients.  If we recommend a dental procedure for your pet during dental month, you will...
Neil Chesterton Lameness Seminar

Neil Chesterton Lameness Seminar

 Wednesday 29 August 2018 Dr Neil Chesterton presents Understanding Lameness: A risky business Common lameness conditions and their risk factors Dr Neil Chesterton, New Zealand, is an international expert on lameness prevention. Neil’s interesting and informative two-part talk will cover common lameness conditions and their risk factors. If preventing lameness is a high priority on your farm this seminar is not to be missed. Date: Wednesday 29 August 2018 Time: 6:45pm for 7pm start Location: Flying Horse Bar & Brewery, Raglan Parade, Warrnambool. RSPV: By 5 pm Tuesday 28 August 2018 Warrnambool Farm Desk 5561 7666 or Terang & Mortlake Veterinary Clinic 5592 2111 Light supper provided Download Seminar...

Care of Downer Cows

Dr Phil Poulton from the Tarwin Vet Clinic in Leongatha, Gippsland spoke at a Farmchat day a couple of years ago. Phil has completed a PhD looking at nursing outcomes for Downer Cows. Phil had some key take-home messages to improve outcomes in the nursing of Downer Cows: Act early in the treatment of these animals  Don’t leave them out in the elements – move them correctly into a protected area with soft bedding Give non-steroidal anti-inflammatory early, such as Tolfejec, Key or Meloxicam Ensure they have access to food and water Roll from side to side to relieve pressure on muscle tissue He has found many animals suffer from secondary conditions like mastitis, hypothermia, dehydration & muscle damage which will generally be the cause of death rather than the primary condition. Lifting needs to be done with care - if using a set of hip clamps then a chest strap should also be used and move only short distances. Otherwise, the bucket of a front end loader is ideal.  Warrnambool Veterinary have developed an easy-to-use flow chart for the potential causes of Down Cows along with a Guide on the Care and Management  of Downer Cows. To order a copy of these valuable resources please contact the Farm Desk on 5561 7666 or email to...

Dirty Cows – Managing Endometritis in Cattle

OVERVIEW OF ENDOMETRITIS Endometritis is a mild, chronic infection of the uterus. It is very common, affecting up to 40% of post-calving cows. The uterus contains pus and there may be discharge from the vulva. The cows do not seem sick and will still eat, milk and cycle normally. However until the infection clears, they will be unlikely to get pregnant.  Some dirty cows are noticed by farmers if they have vaginal discharge or are obviously smelly. However, many do not show any outward signs. Time and money can be wasted in trying to join cows with underlying infections.  There are other types of uterine infections. Pyometra is another type that occurs when the cervix closes and pus is trapped in the uterus, stopping the cow from cycling. Metritis is a severe infection that can cause sick cows, milk drop, fever and even death. These will be treated differently by the vet.  Reduced general health Cows or heifers in poor body condition Poor nutrition Milk fever Downer cows General stress such as: adverse weather, transport, overcrowding, other diseases Reduced uterine health Twins Difficult birth Uterine tears Dead calf Assisted calving/caesarean Retained foetal membranes Diagnosis of endometritis  It is best to check all cows for endometritis 7-28 days after calving to make sure infections can be cleared up in time for the upcoming mating season. Some farmers prefer to only check the “at-risk” cows or those with obvious vaginal discharge, however this means a lot of cases will be missed.  Diagnosis requires a vet to examine the reproductive tract for pus. A grading system can be used depending on the...

Synchronising – Why, Why Not & How

by Dr Charlie Blackwood WHY SYNCHRONISE HEATS? Synchronising cows can have many advantages including: 1. Easier heat detection Simultaneous display of heat by many cows enables easier detection of cows showing subtle or weak signs of oestrous. Heat detection aids such as scratchies, Kamars and tail paint tend to be more reliable when many cows are showing heat at the same time. NB- some synchrony programs have a fixed time for insemination and do not require heat detection for the first insemination. However, good heat detection after the initial insemination can be a critical factor to achieve overall good herd fertility. Good observation and application of heat detection aids are important for the full duration of the AI period. 2. Earlier detection of non-cycling cows Detection of heat earlier in the AI period allows those cows which are not cycling to be identified and therefore treated earlier. Pre-mating heat detection can also work well for some herds. Regardless, all cows that have not displayed a heat by day 21 into the mating period should be vet-checked. Delaying examination of these animals will be cost more money in the longterm. 3. Tighter calving pattern Breeding more cows over a shorter time frame can help tighten the calving pattern. The earlier cows calve, the more likely they are to get back in calf at the subsequent mating period. An increased number of earlier calving cows also increases milk production early in the season. 4. More heifer calves born early Early-born heifers have the advantage over later-born heifers in that they are more likely to achieve target weights for joining. Having a...

Calf Nutrition & Weaning Workshop 16 May 2018

Flying Start Calf Workshops Wednesday 16 May 2018 Workshop Three:  Calf Nutrition & Weaning Presenters: Dr Gemma Chuck Apiam Animal Health, Veterinary Operations – Dairy Dr Ashleigh Hargreaves Warrnambool Veterinary Date: Wednesday 16 May 2018 Time: 6.45 pm for 7 pm start Light supper provided Location: City Memorial Bowls Club, Cramer Street, Warrnambool Cost: $50 per workshop or $200* for all 4 Workshops RSVP Terang: Phone 5592 2111 or email info@tmvc.net.au Warrnambool: Phone 5561 7666 or email...