Getting the Most From Your Vaccines

  Getting The Most From Your Vaccines By Dr Stephen Jagoe This article concentrates on how to get the best response and best herd immunity from your investment in vaccines. There are a number of factors influencing how an animal responds to a vaccine. Vaccines aim to sensitise the cow’s immune system to specific infections so that it produces antibodies and recruits infection fighting white cells to remove the infection, without the animal showing disease signs. The following is a checklist of important factors which influence the success of a vaccine program in a cattle herd. Stress Any stressful event around the time of vaccination will reduce response to vaccines: Weaning and dehorning: vaccinate before undertaking these procedures or wait 10 days before vaccinating animals after these procedures; Transportation: don’t move cattle for 10 days after vaccination, or allow at least 24 hours before vaccination after transporting cattle; Calving: Don’t vaccinate cows for at least 14 days after calving. Temperature Animals are at risk of an adverse reaction to vaccination if it the daytime temperature exceeds 29°. Do not vaccinate animals if the night time temperature doesn’t go below 23°. Vaccination Timing Vaccines need to be given from an early age to fully protect animals from disease. Always follow labels to determine when the first vaccination should be given, and the correct interval to booster vaccinations. As vaccination is an insurance policy against disease, it should be timed to coincide with periods of greater risk. For example 7 in 1 should be given to young calves (according to label directions) then timed to be given prior to first joining...

Veterinary Calf Disbudding Update

Lunch time and afternoon appointments now available Due to an overwhelming increase in demand for our Veterinary Disbudding we have added extra staff allowing us to provide you with more options. With the additional resources we can be far more flexible with appointment times and are able to cater for lunch time or afternoon bookings as well as in the morning. This means that calves that are on once daily feeds can now be fed in the morning and then disbudded later in the same day. We still require the calves to have NOT been fed within 6 hours of the procedure. The calves should be older than 2 weeks of age. Sick calves should have disbudding delayed. Veterinary disbudding with sedation and local anaesthetic, results in an average of 1.4kg greater growth over the 2 week period following disbudding (this is a 17% increase in growth rate over the period). What’s included: Heavy sedation/pain relief Local anaesthetic disbudding Antibiotic protection Hernia checks Removal of extra teats The particulars: Cost: $7.50/Hd. Calves need to be between 2-12 weeks old. We need to have at least 20 calves in a group. Like to know about Veterinary Calf Disbudding from a client’s perspective? Click here! If you wish to discuss calf disbudding then please contact Dr Glenn Cuzens at WarrnamboolVeterinary’s Farm Desk on 5561...

Exciting New Mastitis Research

  Exciting New Mastitis Research By Dr David Beggs In the next few weeks, an important research project will commence at Warrnambool Veterinary. We have been contracted by Bayer Animal Health to trial a new treatment for mastitis. The trial is being run to assist registration of the new product in Australia. Because of this a large number of samples are required. The target number is 600 cases of mastitis in each treatment group. With each herd involved, and with each case of mastitis there will be a bit of paperwork involved so that everything undertaken as part of the trial can be documented. Milk samples will need to be collected for culture by Warrnambool Veterinary staff before treatment, and the treatment course will be also be commenced by one of our staff members. The upside for farmers who choose to be involved are: All treatment costs provided at no cost to the farmer; Mastitis sampling and culture provided at no cost to the farmer, and undertaken by Warrnambool Veterinary Staff; Mastitis sampling will occur before first treatment, and again around three weeks later to assess success of treatment; There will be a payment to the farmer for each case enrolled into the trial; and Dairy farmers will receive up to date knowledge on the mastitis organisms causing mastitis in their herds. We are very excited at being involved in this project, and any farmers who are as excited as us and would like to be involved are invited to contact us for further information. Several farmers have already expressed their interest, but because a large number of samples...

Dirty Cows – Managing Endometritis

By visiting veterinary student, Grace Woodward Maximising Reproductive Efficiency Maximizing your profits on a dairy farm depends on reproductive efficiency. A big part of this is getting cows back in calf quickly. Uterine infections are common after calving and delay the time to the next pregnancy. While pus is present, the cow won’t get in calf. Checking all cows for pus 7-28 days post calving and treating infections is the key to improving reproductive performance. Overview of Endometritis Endometritis is a mild, chronic infection of the uterus. It is very common, affecting up to 40% of post-calving cows. The uterus contains pus and there may be discharge from the vagina. The cows do not seem sick and will still eat, milk and cycle normally. However until the infection clears, they will be unlikely to get pregnant. Some dirty cows are noticed by farmers if they have vaginal discharge or are obviously smelly. However, many do not show any outward signs. Time and money can be wasted in trying to join cows with underlying infections. There are other types of uterine infections. Pyometra is another type that occurs when the cervix closes and pus is trapped in the uterus, stopping the cow from cycling. Metritis is a severe infection that can cause sick cows, milk drop, fever and even death. These will be treated differently by the vet. Risk Factors for Endometritis Reduced general health Heifers > Skinny cows > Poor nutrition > Milk fever > Downer cows > General stress such adverse weather, transport, overcrowding, other diseases Reduced uterine health > Twins > Difficult birth > Uterine tears > Dead calf > Assisted calving > Uterine prolapse > Retained fetal membranes...

Farewell from JK

  Farewell From JK By Dr Jon Kelly To all my friends, colleagues and clients. Hopefully I have seen most of you over the last little while, but for those who I have missed, Jen and I have decided to take the family on a caravan adventure around Australia. We leave at the beginning of August for at least the next 18months (unless the family fight and then we will be back sooner!). Thank you all for your wonderful friendship over the last 12 years. It has been an honour to work with you all. All the best,...

Jon Kelly to leave Warrnambool Veterinary

  Jon Kelly to leave Warrnambool Veterinary By Dr Stephen Jagoe It is with a lot of sadness that we will be losing Jon from Warrnambool Veterinary on July 21. Jon and his wife Jenny (who work at Warrnambool from 2000 to 2003) arrived in Warrnambool in 2005 after working in the UK, at Colac and Mt Gambier. In the last 12 years, they had had three children and established a strong presence in the Allansford community. Jon became a partner in the practice in 2007, and has driven the cattle side of the business to be one of the strongest in Victorian dairy practices. He has had a special interest in dairy cattle reproduction, and many of our clients will have been involved in trials Jon has designed and implemented. As a result of these trials, we now have a much better knowledge of the factors contributing to non-cycling cows in dairy herds, and have been able to demonstrate effective treatments for this group of animals. As part of the dairy cow fertility issue in dairy herds, Jon was one of the first to realise the potential of using heifer management to drive improvements in overall herd fertility. By undertaking trials looking at the effect of bodyweight on heifer fertility we are able to make sound evidence based recommendations on heifer management to achieve high fertility and productivity. From these trials, the Correct Weight program evolved with its associated benefits for our clients. Jon has also undertaken trials of the 10 day fixed time AI program we have recommended for many years, and has proven its benefits in...