Staff Profile: Brodhi Carracher

Name: Brodhi Carracher Role: Mixed Animal Veterinarian Education: 2019 Graduate of The University of Adelaide Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Pets: Boer Goats and Chooks Hobbies: Football and Golf Special Interests: Agriculture is a passion of mine, especially improving efficiency in sheep and beef production. A bit about me … Born and bred western Victorian farm kid who loves playing football on the weekends and enjoys getting back to the farm and looking after the Simmental stud cows and crossbred...

Care of the New Born Cria

What Is Normal? After delivery, the cria will usually stand and drink from the dam within half an hour.  If the cria is not up and drinking within three hours of birth, veterinary attention should be sought to assess and perhaps give fluids or plasma. Warmth At birth, a cria’s temperature should be between 36.8-38.6°C.  A low body temperature is serious and attempts to warm the cria up should be made. Drying and warming cria using heat lamps, towels, hot water bottles etc are all recommended and well-known treatments. Energy In the case of low enrgy , IV fluids are often required but early intervention on farm often makes the difference between success and failure.  Initial on-farm treatment can include 20ml of 40-50% dextrose (glucose) solution, given orally.  Alternatively, smearing honey or golden syrup inside the mouth of a collapsed cria can be a life-saver while waiting for IV fluids. Immune System For the first three weeks of a cria’s life, it has no functional immune system of its own.  The colostrum that the cria drinks in the first 24 hours of life contains all the antibodies that it will receive for those first three weeks of its life.  If a cria does not get sufficient colostrum, or the colostrum quality is poor, it cannot absorb antibodies properly and the chances of that cria dying are greatly increased.  The average death rate in alpaca cria in the USA is 10% within the first three weeks of life.  Of these deaths, 90% are due to septicaemia and the cria’s inability to fight infections. 10% of all alpaca cria born have...

Pregnancy Toxaemia or Twin Lamb Disease

What is Pregnancy Toxaemia? Preg Tox is basically due to lack of energy in late pregnant ewes when the lamb (often 2 or 3 lambs) take more energy than the ewe can provide. The lack of energy is caused by a combination of poor feed in late pregnancy, decreased rumen capacity due to the size of the lambs in the belly and a dramatic increase in energy requirements. The energy and protein requirement for a ewe with twin lambs in the last few weeks is roughly double maintenance. To provide energy, the ewe starts to breakdown body reserve especially fat, however, the liver cannot cope with the increased fat levels. The blood sugar (glucose) levels fall dramatically and the ewe does not have enough energy to function normally – especially the brain, muscles and there is kidney damage. Signs of pregnancy toxaemia? The disease usually appears over several weeks in a percentage of the mob: ewe is separated from the mob ewe is drowsy or comatose ewe is not eating nervous system signs – tremors, blindness lying on their side for 3–4 days death 3–4 days later A sudden reduction in feed due to rough weather, transport, yarding, other diseases and handling can tip ewes with a low grade disease showing no sign of a problem into a ewe with full signs of preg. tox. This means if you have a few cases of preg tox, it is an indication the whole mob may be underfed, even if only a few animals are showing signs. Which sheep are most at risk of pregnancy toxaemia? ewes in late pregnancy especially...

Mucosal Disease

The killer form of BVD (Pestivirus) Warrnambool Veterinary recently investigated a beef farm where 17 out of 90 cattle died over a 12 month period due to MUCOSAL DISEASE. The losses started at about 12 months of age and continued intermittently for 12 months. Animals were often found dead, or were sick for 1 to 2 days before death. Mucosal Disease is a fatal form of BVD which only occurs when cattle persistently infected with BVDV Type 1 become infected with a more virulent strain of BVDV. The disease is usually seen in cattle between 6 and 21 months of age. Mucosal disease causes ulcers in the mouth, intestinal tract, vulva and feet (this can look like foot and mouth disease!), lameness, drooling from the mouth, diarrhoea and death. When the remaining animals were tested, 13 of the remaining 70 animals were Persistently Infected (PIs). The details of BVD are outlined below. In this case, it almost certain the mothers had never encountered BVD and had no immunity. A Persistently Infected animal was introduced when the cows were pregnant in the first 3 months. A large number of PIs were produced. Why so many apparently normal animals developed secondary Mucosal Disease is still being investigated. BVDV or Mucosal Disease is usually known for causing reproductive losses, abortions, ill-thrifty calves and susceptibility to secondary infections. This is true, but BVD can result in fairly sudden death as occurred in this case BVDV or Mucosal Disease is usually known for causing reproductive losses, abortions, ill-thrifty calves and susceptibility to secondary infections. This is true, but BVD can result in fairly sudden...

HHMC October 2019

Herd Health Management Course Practical training delivered by experienced Dairy Veterinarians October dates: Tuesday 22  |  Thursday 24  |  Tuesday 29  |  Thursday 31 Time: 10 am - 2.30 pm. Lunch provided Location: Warrnambool Veterinary conference room, 514 Raglan Parade, Warrnambool. Full course notes and CalfPRO handbook provided. Calf Rearing School  $160 per person  The Total Calf Rearing School is day one of the Herd Health Management Course. Students can choose to do the full Herd Health Management Course or just enrol in the Total Calf Rearing School. Topics covered include: Colostrum management  Nutrition  Worms  Vaccination protocols  Housing  Weight monitoring and management  Coccidiosis, diarrhea, Johne’s Disease Heifer rearing  The Total Calf Rearing School is essential if you are committed to rearing high quality replacement heifers. Download Brochure Herd Health Management Course $395 per person  The course is designed to give an overview of dairy farm management from nutrition to reproduction and mastitis control. It addresses issues we commonly see as a problem on the dairy farms our vets visit. Topics covered include: Reproductive management  Milking Mastitis Control Problems Associated with Calving Metabolic Diseases Calf  Rearing – Management and Diseases Growing Replacements – from Calving to Mating Basics of Nutrition – Use of Grain, Supplements, Pastures, Fodder crops & Problems  Lameness  Salmonella, Worms  Mineral Deficiencies Other diseases  The use of computers in Farm Management – including Dairy Data and Farm Cash  For further information or to enrol in the Total Calf Rearing Course or the Herd Health Management Course call Warrnambool Veterinary Farm Desk on 5561...